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2010 WNBF PRO - MID-AMERICA PRO/AM ADVANCED PRO-QUALIFIER

by Sharon Gayle September 30, 2010

July 31, 2010 - Harrison High School, Evansville, IN.

Pro Figure
Overall - Sofia Rodriguez*
2nd Jennifer Morakis
3rd Anne Glynn
4th Denise Frysinger
5th Jacqueline Zediker
6th Liz Marcantonio
7th Nikki Del Grosso
8th Carol Sandi
9th Alejandra Goncalves
10th Danielle Small
11th Bianca Baker
Sofia Rodriguez  

Pro Men - Heavyweight
Overall - Martin Daniels*

2nd Seth Bauglaman
3rd Kevin Lofy
4th Darren Hagg
5th Erick Jensen
6th Delbert Hickman
7th Ron Fernias
Martin Daniels  

Pro Men - Lightweight
1st Tyler English

2nd Robert Moran
3rd Raphael Calzadilla
4th John Penkin
5th RD Caldwell
6th Omar Raissouni
7th Justin Usery
 Tyler English  

Women's Bodybuilding
1st Cynthia Meyerhofer
2nd Tracey Verdegan
3rd Jennifer Rasmussen
4th Sandy Dickerson
5th Jeanie Welker 

Source: wnbf.net

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Mind Over Anatomy!

by Sharon Gayle September 15, 2010

Amy Palmiero-Winters ...No Limits!


So many of us try, we try hard, and some of us give it what we consider our all.  When we aren't able to accomplish the goals we've set; sometimes we give up and settle for less ...a lot less.

As Fitness Specialist and Wellness Consultant I've met many an individual who felt that they were simply not blessed with the genetics needed to run the marathon, climb the mountain, swim 10-laps, or simply change their body's to become healthier and stronger.

I often say that "genetics has nothing to do with it" because until we have pushed ourselves mentally and physically we cannot know our potential. It often takes many, many, years to push to our physical limits. However, within those years there are many levels of progress that one can achieve; it's simply mind over anatomy!  Read Amy Palmiero- Winters' story and be inspired to challenge yourself to meet your health, wellness, and fitness goals. If you want it ...you can achieve it! ~SG.


Amy Palmiero-Winters

Read complete Newsday Article
Image: Competitor Magazine, Sept. 2010

Tags:

Fitness | General | Health

Shrimp Po' Boy...

by Sharon Gayle September 15, 2010

...Sinfully Good!


This twist on the Louisiana
favorite piles grilled shrimp and creamy-dressed cabbage onto a crusty bun. Bread that's soft on the inside and crusty on the outside is perfect for a Po' Boy sandwich. We grill both sides of a whole-wheat bun for that added crunch. You may need a few extra napkins to enjoy it, but this quick and easy sandwich is well worth it. Consider serving with sauteed corn and bell peppers.

4 servings
Active Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups finely shredded red cabbage
  • 2 tablespoons dill pickle relish
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-fat mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons nonfat plain yogurt
  • 1 pound peeled and deveined raw shrimp
  • 4 teaspoons canola oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 4 whole-wheat hot dog buns, or small sub rolls, split
  • 4 tomato slices, halved\1/4 cup thinly sliced red onion

Preparation

  1. Preheat grill to medium-high.
  2. Combine cabbage, relish, mayonnaise and yogurt in a medium bowl.
  3. Toss shrimp with 2 teaspoons oil, chili powder, paprika and pepper in a medium bowl. Place the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in a small bowl. Dip a pastry brush in water, then in the oil and lightly brush the inside of each bun (or roll).
  4. Place a grill basket on the grill. Add the shrimp and spread in a single layer. Grill, stirring occasionally, until the shrimp are pink and just cooked through, about 3 minutes. Open the buns and grill, turning once, until toasted on both sides, about 1 minute total.
  5. To assemble the sandwiches, divide tomato and onion among the buns. Spread about 1/3 cup cabbage mixture down the middle of each and top with about 1/2 cup grilled shrimp.

Nutrition Per Serving: 322 calories; 10 g fat (1 g sat, 4 g mono); 173 mg cholesterol; 32 g carbohydrates; 4 g added sugars; 28 g protein; 5 g fiber; 522 mg sodium; 490 mg potassium.
Nutrition Bonus: Selenium (92% daily value), Vitamin C (45% dv), Iron & Vitamin A (25% dv), Magnesium (22% dv).
Carbohydrates: 2 Carbohydrate Serving
Exchanges: 1 1/2 starch, 1 vegetable, 3 lean meat, 2 fat

Source: EatingWell:  May/June 2008

Shout Out to Gigi Quinones!

by Sharon Gayle September 15, 2010

Always Smiling!


The summer is coming to a close and Labor day has come and gone. It's back to school for the kids; nevertheless, there are lot's of fun things to do in the Fall.  If you weren't able to make it to the Bronx Zoo, or the Bronx Botanical Gardens it's not too late; and while you're there, take a stroll a few blocks east to GNC, White Plains Road, Pelham Pkwy. There you'll find Gigi Quinones.

    
Gigi Quinones, always smiling!

If you have a product question, she'll have the answer and will gladly help you make a solid decision on what products suit your needs.

I went in last week for a few items, and though Gigi had recently lost her dog Skipper to a heat stroke; she was helpful, attentive and as usual, very courteous!

After hearing the details of her tragic experience, which happened just a few days prior, I was amazed that she could hold it together. But I should not have been surprised. Gigi has always impressed me with her professionalism; thus, the reason that I bypass many a GNC and wait until I am in the Bronx.

So if you're ever in the neighborhood, check out the G. in GNC and tell her I suggested you do so!

A big Shout Out! to Gigi for providing fabulous customer service with a smile; even when smiling might have been difficult.  Thanks Gigi. Keep up the good work! ~SG.

Just How Much Sleep Do We Really Need?

by Sharon Gayle September 15, 2010

Quite a bit it seems!


Though scientists are still learning about the concept of basal sleep need, one thing sleep research certainly has shown is that sleeping too little can not only inhibit your productivity and ability to remember and consolidate information, but lack of sleep can also lead to serious health consequences and jeopardize your safety and the safety of individuals around you.

For example, short sleep duration is linked with:

  • Increased risk of motor vehicle accidents
  • Increase in body mass index – a greater likelihood of obesity due to an increased appetite caused by sleep deprivation
  • Increased risk of diabetes and heart problems
  • Increased risk for psychiatric conditions including depression and substance abuse
  • Decreased ability to pay attention, react to signals or remember new information.

According to researchers Michael H. Bonnet and Donna L. Arand, "There is strong evidence that sufficient shortening or disturbance of the sleep process compromises mood, performance and alertness and can result in injury or death. In this light, the most common-sense 'do no injury' medical advice would be to avoid sleep deprivation."

On the other hand, some research has found that long sleep durations (nine hours or more) are also associated with increased morbidity (illness, accidents) and mortality (death). ...Researchers caution that there is not a definitive conclusion that getting more than nine hours of sleep per night is consistently linked with health problems and/or mortality in adults, while short sleep has been linked to both these consequences in numerous studies.

Though research cannot pinpoint an exact amount of sleep need by people at different ages, the following table identifies the "rule-of-thumb" amounts most experts have agreed upon. Nevertheless, it's important to pay attention to your own individual needs by assessing how you feel on different amounts of sleep. Are you productive, healthy and happy on seven hours of sleep? Or does it take you nine hours of quality ZZZs to get you into high gear? Do you have health issues such as being overweight? Are you at risk for any disease? Are you experiencing sleep problems? Do you depend on caffeine to get you through the day? Do you feel sleepy when driving? These are questions that must be asked before you can find the number that works for you. For complete research article click on link below. ~SG

Excerpt from "How Much Sleep Do We Really Need?"
National Sleep Foundation

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2010 INBF MID-AMERICA PRO/AM ADVANCED PRO-QUALIFIER

by Sharon Gayle September 5, 2010

July 31, 2010 - Harrison High School, Evansville, IN.

Open Women Bodybuilding
1st – Rebecca Miller-Moore – WNBF ROOKIE PRO CARD
2nd – Amy Fitzmaurice
3rd- Dannielle Schneider
 Rebecca Miller  

Open Men Bodybuilding – Heavyweight
1st – Raymond Love-Palomar – WNBF PRO CARD
2nd – Cepeda Munoz
3rd – Reggie Ruffin
4th – Lance Scott
5th – Bryce Bohm
6th – Brad Eger
Raymond Love-Palomar  

Open Fit Body
1st – Liz Marcantonio – WNBF PRO CARD

2nd – Alejandra Goncalves
3rd – Danielle Small
4th – Angela Betz
5th – Kelly Hrabley
6th – Celia Cadena
7th – Brandi Navas
Liz Mercantonio  

Open Men Bodybuilding – Lightweight
1st – Lance Forrest – Overall Winner, Awarded WNBF PRO CARD

2nd – Scott Fanti
3rd – Doug Hawver
4th – Dustin Johnson
5th – Albert Gary
  Lance Forrest  

Open Figure
1st – Suzanne Barlas – WNBF PRO CARD
2nd – Hope Davis
3rd – Tonia Ward
4th – Terra Cardwell
5th – Kelly Hrabley

Masters Men
1st – Lance Forrest

Masters Figure
1st – Tonia Ward
2nd – Kelly Hrabley

For additional segments and results visit inbf.net

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